Cancer 2

I owe all readers an apology. Yesterday my internet was down so I could not post this. Fortunately, it is back and so here it is.

We have all been in lock down – in Spain, where I live, it is gradually opening up and I was able to ask after a friend who died just before the lock down eight weeks ago. I had seen him a few days earlier and he had seemed in robust good health – particularly impressive as he was 84 years old so I was naturally curious as to what had caused his death. I was told that the doctors had detected a small tumour on his gallbladder and he went into hospital to have it surgically removed. The operation was a success but the patient died. It wasn’t the cancer that killed him but the operation itself or the anaesthetic. If he had not had the operation, if he had decided “what the hell, I’ll just live with it!” he would have lived at least another year or two or three or four, perhaps even longer. But, like many people, he wanted it out. Not having an operation might seem a silly thing to do but for anyone over eighty I think it is a reasonable decision. Why? Because cancers in the old are usually slow growing. I was told of the case of an eighty-six year old woman who was told she had breast cancer. The doctors proposed an operation but she refused saying: “I am an old woman. I am going to die someday. Who can say when?” It was her son who told me. She lived with her cancer for another 14 years, dying aged 100.

It is well known that elderly people have a relatively high incidence of not surviving an operation – and there is a greatly increased chance of dementia too within a year of an operation. My own mother, at the age of 75, died while being operated on for an ulcer. She simply wasn’t well enough to emerge from the anaesthetic. I myself am now nearly 71 and I don’t plan to have an operation unless I absolutely have no choice.

So sometimes not doing something for your cancer is the course of wisdom.

Approach 2

The second thing I would do if I were diagnosed with cancer is to take citric acid.

Our data suggests that citrate can inhibit tumor growth in diverse tumor types and via multiple mechanisms. Dietary supplementation with citrate may be beneficial as a cancer therapy.” (– Ren, J., Seth, P., Ye, H. et al. Citrate Suppresses Tumor Growth in Multiple Models through Inhibition of Glycolysis, the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle and the IGF-1R Pathway. Sci Rep 7, 4537 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-04626-4)

Citric acid, or citrate salts (ie magnesium citrate, sodium citrate  etc) interfere with glycolysis.  Glycolysis is the process by which sugars are broken down – and cancers love sugars. This is how they get their energy. Stop glycolysis and you stop cancer. It’s that simple. And, as this research summary makes clear , citrate also interferes with other processes that help cancer grow.

Citric acid is easily and cheaply available – it’s used in cookery and for preserving foods. The authors of one study suggested 1-2 grams every 12 hours, increasing to 1-2 grams every 8 hours. These are very conservative amounts which are a useful starting off point but one Mexican doctor [details in my book The Cancer Survivor’s Bible] recommends increasing the dose slowly but steadily until you can take a flat tablespoon (15 grams) of citric acid powder three times a day (total 45 grams) with meals. You would be advised to increase doses slowly because a sudden assault can cause the cancers to break up and release toxins into the body – some people have died because of this. Their treatment was too successful! So start with say 4-6 grams and every couple of days increase by another 2 grams until you get to the required level. Take with food.

So that would be the second part of my own cancer recovery programme. 

For more information I do recommend my book The Cancer Survivor’s Bible www.fightingcancer.com

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